Wedesday 2/22 will be a chat (and exam review) day, so ToW #3 will be due at 8am that morning.

Please see the Thoughts-of-the-Week page for more information.

Exam #1 is scheduled for Fri 2/24; the review sheet is now up on the Exams page.

Friday 02/10 will be a chat day, so ToW #2 will be due at 8am that morning.

Please see the Thoughts-of-the-Week page for more information.

UPDATE: As before, the ToWs are now posted here. Please go there by Monday’s class and post a comment on what you thought was best in the ToWs this week.

The first chat day is Wed 02/01, and so the first Thought-of-the-Week is due at 8am that morning.

Please see the Thoughts-of-the-Week page for more information.

UPDATE: The ToWs are now posted here.

FURTHER UPDATE: By Friday, go to the ToW #1 page, go to the bottom and add a comment saying what comment from which ToW did you think was most interesting or thing from one of the ToWs?

Please fill out the quick survey on the Online Activities page.

Day 1 notes

The overheads for the first day (Mon 01/23) are now up on the Overheads page. Use the password from class.

I won’t normally post on the main page when I put up the overheads; I’m just doing it today because it’s our first day.

This is the home page for Philosophy 442/542, Phenomenology, being taught in the Spring semester of 2017 by Professor Ron McClamrock of the University at Albany Department of Philosophy. You can get a prliminary course syllabus here. I expect some minor changes for the Spring 2017 version of the course.

If you have questions about the site or the course, please e-mail me at rmcclamrock at albany dot edu.

Course Description: This course examines the historical and conceptual development of phenomenology in the 20th century, starting with Husserl’s “presuppositionless and purely descriptive science of the structures of consciousness”, and including works by Sartre, Heidegger, and Merleau-Ponty. We’ll emphasize (a) the idea of a presuppositionless account of consciousness; (b) the motivations for and nature of the “existential turn”, and (c) connections between phenomenology and both analytic philosophy and scientific psychology.